ITF Classification - Surfaces

Surface Code       Type Description
 A  Acrylic1          Textured, pigmented, resin-bound coating.
B  Artificial clay2   Synthetic surface with the appearance of clay.
C   Artificial grass2 Synthetic surface with the appearance of natural grass.
D   Asphalt3          Bitumen-bound aggregate.
E   Carpet            Textile or polymeric material supplied in rolls or sheets of finished product.
F   Clay              Unbound mineral aggregate.
G  Concrete        Cement-bound aggregate.
H  Grass               Natural grass grown from seed.
J   Other              E.g. modular systems (tiles), wood, canvas.
 
Notes:
All surfaces may be porous or non-porous, with the exception of ‘Clay’ and ‘Grass’, which are always porous.
1 Normally forms only the uppermost few millimetres of a court.
2 “Appearance” relates only to the form of the uppermost surface material and not other characteristics (e.g. colour).
3 Used only when the material itself forms the playing surface. When used as a base for other surfaces (e.g. acrylic), reference will be made only to the playing surface.
4 This term denotes a class of surface that is constructed from naturally-derived materials, and includes a fine gritty material as the uppermost (playing) layer, e.g. fast-dry.
 
 Note: ITF Classification does not imply any form of ITF approval or endorsement.
  
CATEGORY 1
Name of surface product Surface
code
Expiry date
120 Tennis Clay
C
 08.01.12
Bross Clay (clay-dressed)
B
 25.09.10
Bross G-Clay (sand-dressed)
B
 30.05.11
FieldTurf Tarkett Melbourne
C
 29.03.10
Laykold Cushion Plus System
A
 31.01.11
Plexipave IW (2006)
A
 12.12.09
Rebound Ace HSA Club “S”
A
 06.11.11
Rebound Ace Pro International “S”
A
 06.11.11
RoyalClay Pro (clay-dressed)
B
 02.06.11
Sit-In Sport Cepiemme Red Brick 15
(clay-dressed)
B
 13.11.11
Sportflex
E
 03.07.10
Sportfloor Clay (clay-dressed)
B
 24.10.10
Tennis Force
F
 01.06.09
CATEGORY 2
Name of surface product Surface
code
Expiry date
12 TS Match Point
C
30.10.10
AllSport
A
 13.11.11
ASI – Court Tournament XP Pro
C
 31.01.11
DecoColor
A
 17.04.10
Decoflex Universal TX 9mm
A
 12.04.09
FieldTurf Tarkett Basic XT-20
C
 31.12.09
Grand Clay 12 (sand-dressed)
B
 03.12.11
MondoTurf NSF 66 15
C
 17.07.10
RuKortPro
E
 11.05.09
Surface Evolution
A
 23.07.09
T.E.A.M. Sports Masters SL
C
 16.05.10
TigerTurf Advantage
C
 21.05.10
Tournement LSR 12
C
 29.10.10
CATEGORY 3
Name of surface product
code
Expiry date
AC Hi-Court
A
 16.04.11
AC Play Cushion System
A
 12.11.09
Bross Slide (Indoor Court)
E
 21.02.11
Champward CA-101
A
 15.08.09
Champward CA-102
A
 20.11.09
Champward CW-301
E
 15.08.09
Chaoda Tennis Court
A
 30.11.10
Classic Clay (sand-dressed)
B
 14.08.09
DecoTurf
A
 17.04.10
Edel Advantage Red Court (sand-dressed)
 30.09.11
Edel Elite Soft
C
 31.05.09
Elastosport plus Elastoturf
A
 18.02.09
Flexibility Sport 8mm GH Pro
A
 06.12.10
Flexibility Sport GH 100
A
 06.12.10
Flexibility Sport GH M100 Plus
A
 06.12.10
Grand Slam 10
C
 03.12.11
Greenset Grand Prix
A
 14.11.11
Greenset Grand Prix Cushion
A
 14.03.10
Greenset Trophy
E
 20.03.11
LaxWay LW-Cushion
A
 15.06.10
Laykold Colorcoat System
A
 31.05.09
NewGrass Red Clay 12mm (sand-dressed)
 16.05.09
NewGrass T6 20
C
 17.05.10
Novacrylic Combination System 2
A
 30.11.09
PlayPave
A
 01.10.10
Plexicushion Prestige
A
 12.12.09
Plexipave (2006)
A
 12.12.09
Pro Vantage
A
 01.10.10
Rebound Ace Pro International “MF”
 06.11.11
Rebound Ace Synpave
A
 06.11.11
RuKortRTT
E
 11.05.09
Sit-In Sport Smash 10
C
 13.11.11
Supersoft Doppio
A
 23.07.09
T.E.A.M. Sports Grand Prix
C
 30.11.09
Taraflex Tennis ATP
E
 27.11.11
Tiger Cushion
A
 01.10.10
TigerPave
A
01.10.10
TigerTurf Rally (sand-dressed)
B
 21.05.10
Truflex MultiSport
A
 04.11.11
CATEGORY 4
Name of surface product Surface
Code
Expiry date
Acryflex T Cushion
A
 25.09.11
Advantage II
A
 23.02.09
Apron Acrylic System
A
 17.12.11
Apron Cushion SD
A
 17.12.11
Classic Turf System
A
 25.01.10
Courtsol Pro
A
 28.02.09
Courtsol Standing
A
 28.02.09
Courtsol Tournoi
A
 28.02.09
FieldTurf Tarkett Olympus
C
 31.12.09
Greenset Confort
A
   14.11.11
Latex-ite Fast
A
   26.03.10
LaxWay LW-Color
A
   15.06.10
Nova Ultracushion System (2006)
A
   01.11.09
Novacushion System
A
   01.11.09
Pavitex Tennis RK
E
   28.11.09
Play-Ace Cushion I
A
  05.12.09
Play-Ace Cushion II
A
   05.12.09
Play-Turf
E
   31.03.10
Plexicushion Prestige HU (2006)
A
   12.12.09
Porous Kushion Kourt
A
   08.01.12
Pro DecoTurf
A
   17.04.10
Proflex Hardcourt
A
   03.07.10
Proflex In-situ Cushion
A
   03.07.10
Rebound Ace HSA Club “MF”
A
   06.11.11
RuKortAce
E
   30.06.09
RuKortCup
E
   11.05.09
RuKortHard
A
   10.07.10
RuKortHardTournament MF
A
   14.10.11
RuKortTour
A
   14.10.11
Schöpp-Allround
E
   12.09.11
Schöpp-Challenge
E
   12.09.11
Schöpp-Classic
E
   12.09.11
Schöpp-Slide
E
   12.09.11
Shell Flintkote BUR 4
A
   12.04.09
Supersoft WS
A
   23.07.09
T & F Material Supercourt
A
   16.05.10
T.E.A.M. Sports Tiebreak
C
   30.11.09
TechTennis Medium Cushion
A
   14.11.11
Tennis Incorporated ProTour 3
A
   31.01.12
Toplus ColorPlus System
A
   28.02.10
Toplus Cushion System
A
   28.02.10
CATEGORY 5
Name of surface product
code
Expiry date
Acryflex T Standart
A
25.09.11
Apron Cushion EX
A
 17.12.11
APU Hi-Court
J
 19.08.11
BounceBack® Athletic Surfacing
J
 16.12.11
Composport Tennis
A
 04.11.11
Courtsol Comfort
A
 28.02.09
Decoflex Softcourt 3mm
A
 28.02.09
Decoflex Softcourt 5mm
A
 28.02.09
Decoflex Softcourt 7mm
A
 28.02.09
Decoflex Softcourt 9mm
A
 28.02.09
DuraCourt® Athletic Surfacing
J
 16.12.11
Durflex® 200 sp
A
 08.09.11
Durflex® 200 sp Cushion
A
 08.09.11
Edel Elite LSR 20
C
 31.05.09
Edel Elite Supersoft
C
 27.03.10
FieldTurf Tarkett Grand Prix
E
 31.12.09
Floorgum A 19 24.01.11
Grand Slam Resilience Sport Flooring –
GS200i
A
 26.01.10
Grand Slam Resilience Sport Flooring –
GS400i
A
 26.01.10
Grand Slam Resilience Sport Flooring –
GS600i
A
   26.01.10
Ground Sky
A
   30.11.10
Pavitex Tennis Velour
E
   28.11.09
Play-Ace Pro
A
   05.12.09
PowerGameTM
J
   09.07.11
Rebound Ace Grand Slam
A
  31.12.09
RuKortHardTournament F
A
   14.10.11
SportDeckTM
J
    09.07.11
SportGameTM
    09.07.11
Taraflex Tennis Tournoi
E
    29.08.11
TechTennis Fast Cushion
A
Tennislife Fast Non-Cushion
A
     14.11.11
Tennislife Medium Non-Cushion
A
     14.11.11
Tesport Plus
A
     06.07.10
TigerTurf Volley
C
     21.05.10
Truflex Acrylic
A
     04.11.11
Truflex Cushion
A
 04.11.11
Truflex Ultra Cushion
A
 04.11.11
VHAF® NottsSward® TS
C
 29.08.11
The above would seem to give a bewildering choice of court types , but the choice for a club in Ireland will primarily be based on the factors below:-
·         Cost
·         Longevity, if carefully specified and installed
·         Suitability for weather conditions i.e. can be played on all year round and will be available for play shortly after rain
·         Reasonable maintenance programme
·         Suitability for all grades of players
·         Aesthetic appeal
 
Generally speaking Artificial Grass over asphalt (medium pace)  Code C and D Category 3 has become the surface of choice for tennis clubs in Ireland
 
It should however be recognised that Artificial Grass over asphalt have limitations in use for high level play and is not used, in general, on the international circuit. This is due to Federer, Murray, Nadal. What do the world’s top three players have in common? At least two things:
·         Each spent much of his formative years as a player being coached, practicing and competing on the world’s slowest surface – clay courts.
·         Each has been able to translate the skills learnt on the slowest surface into success on the world’s fastest surface – grass. Specifically the manicured grass of the All England Club, London SW19. At Wimbledon Federer has reigned for the last seven years with the exception of Nadal`s 2008 triumph. Meanwhile Murray reached the semifinals this year, and is frequently touted as a future champion.
 
Why does developing ones game on slow courts set the seed for future success on a variety of surfaces? The key fact is that slow courts force a player to fully develop all aspects of his or her game. There are four areas in tennis that must be mastered in order to become a complete player, and the speed of the surface that you learn the game on effects each of them:
 
TECHNIQUE: Because the rallies on slow courts tend to last longer, players develop sound technique that allows them to be consistent. Consistency is the fundamental building block of winning tennis.
 
TACTICS: Because it is harder to hit a winning shot on slow courts, players are forced to learn how to `construct` a point. They become expert at moving the opponent around, finding and hitting to a weakness, and knowing when to be patient and when to go for broke.
 
PHYSICAL: Longer points mean more physical exertion, so players who develop their game on slow courts tend to be fitter than their `fast court` counterparts.
 
MENTAL: Long points `pressurize` a player mentally, so they learn to cope well with the psychological challenges of match play on any surface. Who wants to lose a point that has gone on for 20 shots? The more time and effort invested in a point, the more a player wants to win it. Slow courts make for more `pressure points`, so pressure points become not such a big deal.
 
Lets focus on club tennis. What are the benefits of installing slower courts at your club? A recent survey by Tennis Australia found that one of the main factors causing people to drop out of tennis was that “the game is too difficult”. The ITF`s Play and Stay campaign (which introduced smaller courts and slower balls for less skilled players), has helped enormously with this stumbling block. The final piece of the jigsaw here in Ireland is for clubs to think in terms of laying the type of courts that give players more time to get to the ball and play their shot. This will lead to longer rallies, which equates to more success, more fun and more motivation to continue playing.
 
Clay courts may not be ideal for the Irish climate, due to the fact that crushed house brick absorbs a lot of water and takes quite a while to dry out (members of the marvellous Tipperary LTC may beg to differ!). But there are other types of tennis court on the market that are well suited to our climate, and provide the sort of slow to medium paced bounce that gives players of all ages a little more time to respond to their opponents shot. If your club is considering resurfacing some or all of the courts put some thought into whether you should change to a slower surface, then put some research into which type of slower court would work best at your club